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Please note:  Items with [PDF]
will require Adobe  Reader to view them.  If you do not have the program, you may download it from Adobe.



Prior presentation information
(topics that have either a link to a web site or where a copy of the  presentation has been made available)

 


 

     
 

Chapter Meetings
General Meeting Information

 

    (Please note location(s) of each meeting.  Directions to each location .)

         October 8, 2014  (Tacoma)  7PM
October 13, 2014  (Olympia)  7PM

Mark Turner:  Fifty Native Trees & Shrubs for Northwest Gardens

Trees and shrubs are the backbone of any garden. They provide structure, shade,
food and shelter for wildlife, and year-around interest. Very often, gardeners think
first of exotic trees, overlooking most of our natives. Learn to go beyond Oregon-
grape, kinnikinnick, and red-osier dogwood in your garden. There are good choices
for wet sites, for sun or shade, for cool west-side gardens and for parched eastern
Washington sites. Learn the strengths (and weaknesses) of both evergreen and
deciduous species. You don’t have to go 100% native, but including locally adapted
trees and shrubs can save you money on your water bill while making your yard
more attractive to  wildlife. Mark Turner draws on his work in the new field guide,
Trees & Shrubs of the Pacific Northwest
, in this program.

Mark Turner is the owner of Turner Photographics and has been a professional
photographer since 1993, specializing in gardens and native plants for books,
magazines, and commercial clients. Mark is the photographer and co-author of
Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest
(Timber Press, 2006) and Bellingham
Impressions
(Far Country Press, 2007), and the smartphone app, Washington
Wildflowers
. His latest book, Trees and Shrubs of the Pacific Northwest, published
by Timber Press, is now available and will be on sale at the meeting. Mark teaches
flower photography classes several times each year at Siskiyou Field Institute,
North Cascades Institute, and other northwest locations.



November 10, 2014  (Olympia)  7PM
David Nicandri: Rhyme of the Great Navigator: Echoes of
Captain Cook in the Journals of Lewis & Clark

In the self enclosed micro-universe of Lewis and Clark studies, the Corps of Discovery's greatest moments are seen as unique, one of kind, or otherwise extraordinary.  However, when studied in comparison to other expeditions, the experience of Lewis & Clark is seen not as an exception, but a part of continuum of effort and manner of expression.  In this talk David Nicandri draws on the ways the voyage and literature of Captain Cook's three voyages anticipated or pre-figured events or explanations of the Lewis & Clark expedition.

David L. Nicandri, former director of the Washington State Historical Society, holds a Master’s Degree in history from the University of Idaho, Nicandri has been an adjunct instructor at The Evergreen State College and has served as a consulting historian in a number of capacities, including three terms as a speaker in the “Inquiring Mind” program at Humanities Washington. He has authored  numerous books including: Olympia’s Forgotten Pioneers: The Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Northwest Chiefs: Gustav Sohon’s Views of the 1855 Stevens Treaty Councils, and River of Promise: Lewis and Clark on the Columbia. More recently Nicandri is co-editor of Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage, to be published later this year by the University of Washington Press. Currently, Nicandri is working on Captain James Cook’s 18th century search for Northwest Passage and that quest’s relevance to the present-day issue of climate change.


November 12, 2014  (Tacoma)  7PM
David George Gordon: Life in the Slow Lane: Understanding Slugs and Snails in Gardens and the Wild


In his book, “The Secret World of Slugs and Snails: Life in the Very Slow Lane”, David George Gordon invites readers to “step into a world that, until now, you’ve only stepped on.” During David’s presentation, he’ll share his insights about West Coast slugs and snails, their curious behaviors, relationships with native plants and fungi, and the many niches they fill in the natural world.  He’ll also explain how to forge a meaningful and lasting peace with these slimesters and offer tips for controlling their damage to our flower gardens and vegetable plots.  A book signing will follow his talk.

David George Gordon is the award-wining author of 19 books about subjects ranging from gray whales and orcas to cockroaches, tarantulas and the Sasquatch. The New York Times called his Field Guide to the Slug "gripping. ”He’s been featured in The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, Time magazine and National Geographic Kids and appeared on Conan O'Brien, The Howie Mandel Show and The View. He’s spoken at the American Museum of Natural History, San Diego Zoo, San Francisco Botanical Garden, Heritage Museums and Gardens, Northwest Flower & Garden Show and many other venues.  


December 8, 2014  (Olympia)  7PM
December 10, 2014  (Tacoma)  7PM
Holiday Celebrations and Member Presentations

Chapter members involved in native plant activities and projects are invited to informally present what they have done or are working on.  Presentations can include pictures, slides or other materials and can be as informal as simply speaking about your work.  We request that speakers limit their presentations/talks to no more than 10 minutes.  In addition to these member presentations, we hope to have trip leaders present brief overviews of the trip(s) they have led.  Beverages will be provided.  Bring your favorite hors d'oeuvre to share.


January 12, 2015  (Olympia)  7PM
Nathan Reynolds: Cowlitz Huckleberry Season: “When Now They Ripen…”

In the pre-colonization era, indigenous people throughout the entire Pacific Northwest eagerly anticipated and celebrated the annual ripening of Mountain Huckleberry (Vaccinium membranaceum).  These berries served as an important food resource, and associated traditions became deeply woven into the cultures of the people. Tribal groups from different regions, lifeways and languages came together in high-elevation berry fields to trade unique culture items, gamble, sing, race horses, see old relatives and marry new ones.  As this annual festival came to an end with the onset of fall rains, certain individuals with the right spirit powers, remained in the berryfields.  When conditions were right, they set fire to the fields to burn out young conifers, stimulate new growth and sprouting, and provide a flush of fertilizer from the ashes.

In recent years, the Natural Resources Dept. of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe has worked in its ancestral landscape on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest to document traditional huckleberrying sites and develop a suite of site-appropriate management actions to conserve, restore, and maintain these sites. Although these management activities are modern in technique, they are simply a continuation of the Cowlitz traditions of landscape management and cultural focus on huckleberry persistence.

Nathan Reynolds is an ecologist for the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, where he studies prehistoric and historic interactions between humans and the habitats and species of what is now southwest Washington State. His work and research follows the Cowlitz seasonal round: spring eulachon, summer prairies and berries, fall Coho salmon and acorns, through winter storytelling and traditional craft.


January 14, 2015  (Tacoma)  7PM
Dave Nicandri: Cook’s Third Voyage and the Evolution of the Northwest Passage

James Cook and the Evolution of the Northwest Passage as a Cartographic Image."  Drawn from Nicandri’s work in progress book on Cook's voyaging in the high latitudes, and the map collection of the Washington State Historical Society, this illustrated lecture shows the progression of European depiction of the Pacific basin from the 16th century forward, emphasizing the pivotal cartographic implications of the great navigator's third and final voyage in quest of the Northwest Passage and its aftermath.

David L. Nicandri, former director of the Washington State Historical Society, holds a Master’s Degree in history from the University of Idaho, Nicandri has been an adjunct instructor at The Evergreen State College and has served as a consulting historian in a number of capacities, including three terms as a speaker in the “Inquiring Mind” program at Humanities Washington. He has authored  numerous books including: Olympia’s Forgotten Pioneers: The Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Northwest Chiefs: Gustav Sohon’s Views of the 1855 Stevens Treaty Councils, and River of Promise: Lewis and Clark on the Columbia. More recently Nicandri is co-editor of Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage, to be published later this year by the University of Washington Press. Currently, Nicandri is working on Captain James Cook’s 18th century search for Northwest Passage and that quest’s relevance to the present-day issue of climate change.
 


Meeting Locations:

OLYMPIA
Washington State Capitol Museum Coach House
211 21st Avenue SW
Olympia, WA 98501
360.753.2580

Directions to the Washington State Capital Museum: From Interstate 5 in Olympia, take Exit 105, following the "State Capital/City Center" route. Go through a tunnel, (get in the left hand lane) and turn left on Capital Way. Follow the brown and white "State Capital Museum" signs to 21st Avenue. Turn right on 21st Avenue and proceed two blocks. The museum is on the left in a stucco mansion.  We meet in the carriage house in back of the mansion.
 

TACOMA
Tacoma Nature Center
1919 South Tyler Street
Tacoma, WA  98405
253.591.6439

Directions to the Tacoma Nature Center: From Interstate 5, take State Highway 16 towards Gig Harbor. Look for the 19th Street EAST, exit and take it, which puts you onto South 19th Street. Travel to the first light, turn right on South Tyler, and then left into the first driveway at the Tacoma Nature Center.


General Meeting Information

South Sound Chapter presentations are held on the
second Monday and Wednesday of the month (October through May, in Olympia and Tacoma, respectively):

  • In Olympia, we typically gather at the Washington State Capitol Museum (211 21st Avenue SW; 360-753-2580).
  • In Tacoma, we typically gather at the Tacoma Nature Center (1919 South Tyler; 253-591-6439).
  • On occasion, however, our presentations are held at alternate facilities to accommodate larger audiences, so please be sure to note where each  meeting is held before you embark.

All meetings are open to the public and most are free of charge. Refreshments are typically provided by WNPS volunteers. We hope you'll join us for an evening of camaraderie and education about the world of native plants as well as the habitats that they create and sustain.

Outside of field trips and holiday gatherings, most meetings start at 7:00 pm. These "meetings" consist of a quick preview of activity announcements, but are mostly grounded in presentations that last 45 minutes to over an hour. Our topics are geared to attract and speak to neophytes and amateurs, as well as "dyed-in-the-wool" or otherwise committed botanists. We may be biased, but we think our presentations are top of the line!  

Members and the public are invited to attend all presentations.  For more information about our programs, please contact the Chapter Chair.

We hope to see all of you at the meetings!!!